A house, like the human body, is a sum of its parts; something happening in one room can often have an effect on another. This is obvious in certain instances, for example a loud TV in the lounge might impair the silence of the bedroom above and a hot hob or few in the kitchen can significantly increase the temperature of all adjoining rooms.

There are other instances however that may not be quite as apparent, whether it is because their effect is minimal or because their cause is not immediately visible or clear; and it is often these that go unnoticed and unaddressed. Some people may hold the opinion that if something is so innocuous that it cannot be noticed then there is no need to take potentially expensive steps to correct it, but costs have only risen in recent years so wouldn't the wisest recourse be to air on the side of caution?

We believe it is, which is why we're going to tell you why and how you can draught-proof your home with acrylic. When you're cold what you're actually feeling is the temperature difference between your body and the ambient temperature. Radiators and heaters aim to increase a homes ambient temperature, whilst the wind and the temperature outdoors is constantly trying to lower it.

Secondary Glazing


There are several points of access at which the cold weather can penetrate a home, the most obvious being an open door or window, but these can be resolved quite easily. Having said that, even when closed a glass window does a very poor job at keeping the cold out, as you only have to place your hand on one to find that they are a very poor insulator. Though not exactly draughty, cold windows do contribute to their chilling effects, fortunately there is an acrylic solution for this.

Secondary Glazing Window

Perspex magnetic secondary glazing kits are a cheap and easy-to-apply alternative to double-glazing, made up of sticky magnetic strips and extruded Perspex acrylic. Ordered cut to size for the perfect fit, the magnetic strips are simply placed around the window frame and then the acrylic is stuck on to them. The strips very securely hold onto the lightweight acrylic sheet, effectively creating an airtight, insulated seal.

Secondary Glazing Window 2


Moreover, the Perspex sheet will have no negative effect on the windows light transmittance, but it will help to reduce noise-pollution from outdoors and can be easily removed. Once removed the perspex sheet and the magnetic strips can be safely stored and reapplied when the weather starts to take a turn again the following year, thereby making secondary glazing kits a cost-effective and efficient means of draught-proofing a home

Chimney Downdraught


One of the most forgotten about entrances to a home is the fireplace and chimney; which is surprising considering winter is the time of year we hear most about chimneys and how they can be used as an effective means of entering a home. A fireplace is no doubt an aesthetically pleasing feature, but in this day and age many of us will not likely choose to use one over a more contemporary form of heating.

3mm anti reflective acrylic

Just to be clear, we're by no means saying that you ought to have your fireplace filled in or gotten rid of; only that it would be a good idea to have safeguards in place. Clear acrylic sheets are as clear, if not more so than glass, and can be bent and joined together to create the perfect wind-guard. What's more, acrylic is incredibly sturdy and has superior insulation properties to glass, making it ideal to have around an open fireplace in the presence of excited children.

4mm clear acrylic


There are many ways to draught-proof your home with acrylic, but these two suggestions ought to give you enough food for thought and allow you to be inspired by how acrylic sheets can be used to keep the cold out of your house this winter. If you do come up with any ideas on how to use acrylic to draught-proof your home, and you choose to implement them, take a snap-shot and send them our way. We'd love to see it!


Post By Alem